The Color of Home on Goodreads’ Lists

Hi all,

The Color of Home is on a number of lists as detailed below.  If you have a Goodreads account and are interested in voting for the book on one or more of the lists, that would be greatly appreciated.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Rich

The Color of Home

The Color of Home > Lists

by Rich Marcello (Goodreads Author)

Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuireFifty Shades of Grey by E.L. JamesHopeless by Colleen HooverEffortless by S.C. StephensSlammed by Colleen Hoover

Best Book Boyfriends

2536th out of 6,051 books — 21,412 voters
The Moon Dwellers by David EstesObsidian by Jennifer L. ArmentroutClockwork Angel by Cassandra ClareInsurgent by Veronica RothVampire Academy by Richelle Mead

Books I wish will turn into movies

288th out of 547 books — 548 voters
Daddy Morebucks by Normandie AllemanCaptured by Erica StevensLove, Lex by Avery AsterYours Truly, Taddy by Avery AsterPoor Little Daddy's Girl by Normandie Alleman

Little Known Romances that are Great

90th out of 158 books — 261 voters
The Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingThe Lightning Thief by Rick RiordanTwilight by Stephenie MeyerThe Giver by Lois Lowry

Best Young Adult Books

6011th out of 10,163 books — 66,480 voters
Pride and Prejudice by Jane AustenJane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëTwilight by Stephenie MeyerThe Notebook by Nicholas SparksRomeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Best Love Stories

1293rd out of 3,321 books — 7,262 voters
Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuireEasy by Tammara WebberFifty Shades of Grey by E.L. JamesThoughtless by S.C. StephensEffortless by S.C. Stephens

College Romance

840th out of 1,092 books — 7,155 voters
Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuireFifty Shades of Grey by E.L. JamesThoughtless by S.C. StephensBared to You by Sylvia DayFifty Shades Darker by E.L. James

Intense And “Angsty” Romance

1230th out of 1,990 books — 6,002 voters
The Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsPride and Prejudice by Jane AustenTo Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeeJane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëGone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Best Female Lead Characters

1871st out of 3,675 books — 4,637 voters
Little Bee by Chris CleaveThe House Girl by Tara ConklinThe Truth About Alice by Jennifer MathieuThe Girl Who Could Silence the Wind by Meg MedinaClara and Mr. Tiffany by Susan Vreeland

Profiles in Silhouette

57th out of 112 books — 20 voters
Charmed Life by Diana Wynne JonesThe Big Wide Calm by Rich MarcelloCryoBurn by Lois McMaster BujoldDreamcatcher by Stephen KingMatter of Choice by R.M. Alexander

My Favorite Authors

8th out of 26 books — 9 voters
Born at Midnight by C.C. HunterThe Big Wide Calm by Rich MarcelloThe Summoning by Kelley ArmstrongThe Gathering by Kelley ArmstrongThe Iron King by Julie Kagawa

Best Love And YA Books

10th out of 16 books — 9 voters
Bound by Duty by Stormy SmithThe Many Lives of Ruby Iyer by Laxmi HariharanMagic America by C.E. MedfordStarlet's Light by Carla J. HannaThe Syrian Virgin by Zack Love

Fabulous Reads for Upper Teens and New Adult

87th out of 157 books — 146 voters
Bet Me by Jennifer CrusieCan You Keep a Secret? by Sophie KinsellaMatch Me If You Can by Susan Elizabeth PhillipsThe Notebook by Nicholas SparksIt Had to Be You by Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Best Ever Contemporary Romance Books

1730th out of 2,994 books — 6,404 voters
Divergent by Veronica RothThe Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingGraceling by Kristin CashoreCity of Bones by Cassandra Clare

Original Stories . . . a Breath of Fresh Air

2111th out of 3,780 books — 6,423 voters
City of Bones by Cassandra ClareHush, Hush by Becca FitzpatrickThe Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsTwilight by Stephenie MeyerLast Sacrifice by Richelle Mead

Character You Most Want to Sleep With

1803rd out of 3,235 books — 4,527 voters
City of Ashes by Cassandra ClareHush, Hush by Becca FitzpatrickClockwork Angel by Cassandra ClareMarked by P.C. CastCity of Glass by Cassandra Clare

Books That Should Be Made Into Movies

10815th out of 21,629 books — 57,104 voters
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeeThe Help by Kathryn StockettThe Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini1984 by George OrwellPride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Best Page-Turners with Redeeming Social Value

897th out of 1,442 books — 3,612 voters
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern1Q84 by Haruki MurakamiThe Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWittThe Peach Keeper by Sarah Addison AllenThe American Heiress by Daisy Goodwin

Best Cover Art 2011 (Non-YA)

244th out of 276 books — 1,614 voters
Gabriel's Inferno by Sylvain ReynardTouchStone for play by Sydney JamessonTouchStone for giving by Sydney JamessonGabriel's Redemption by Sylvain ReynardGabriel's Rapture by Sylvain Reynard

Best Romance I’ve read so far

141st out of 312 books — 174 voters
Bewitched in Time by Scarlet BlackTable 21 by T. Rafael CiminoNumber 13 by M.G. WellsThe Zombie Room by R.D. RonaldThe Elephant Tree by R.D. Ronald

Best Fireside Books

29th out of 62 books — 36 voters
The Other Side of Eve by Paul IkinWinter by Marissa MeyerShatter Me by Tahereh MafiWildwood by Colin MeloyThe Last of the Firedrakes by Farah Oomerbhoy

Most Beautiful Book Covers Ever

341st out of 370 books — 301 voters

The Big Wide Calm On Goodreads’ Lists

Hi all,

The Big Wide Calm is on a number of lists as detailed below.  If you have a Goodreads account and are interested in voting for the book on one or more of the lists, that would be greatly appreciated.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Rich

The Big Wide Calm

The Big Wide Calm > Lists

by Rich Marcello (Goodreads Author)

Daddy Morebucks by Normandie AllemanCaptured by Erica StevensLove, Lex by Avery AsterYours Truly, Taddy by Avery AsterPoor Little Daddy's Girl by Normandie Alleman

Little Known Romances that are Great

32nd out of 158 books — 261 voters
Pride and Prejudice by Jane AustenJane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëTwilight by Stephenie MeyerThe Notebook by Nicholas SparksRomeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Best Love Stories

959th out of 3,321 books — 7,262 voters
Charmed Life by Diana Wynne JonesThe Big Wide Calm by Rich MarcelloCryoBurn by Lois McMaster BujoldFalling Angels by Tracy ChevalierDreamcatcher by Stephen King

My Favorite Authors

1st out of 26 books — 9 voters
The Moon Dwellers by David EstesObsidian by Jennifer L. ArmentroutClockwork Angel by Cassandra ClareInsurgent by Veronica RothVampire Academy by Richelle Mead

Books I wish will turn into movies

173rd out of 547 books — 548 voters
The Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingThe Lightning Thief by Rick RiordanTwilight by Stephenie MeyerThe Giver by Lois Lowry

Best Young Adult Books

2853rd out of 10,163 books — 66,480 voters
Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuireFifty Shades of Grey by E.L. JamesHopeless by Colleen HooverEffortless by S.C. StephensSlammed by Colleen Hoover

Best Book Boyfriends

1881st out of 6,051 books — 21,412 voters
Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuireEasy by Tammara WebberFifty Shades of Grey by E.L. JamesThoughtless by S.C. StephensEffortless by S.C. Stephens

College Romance

520th out of 1,092 books — 7,155 voters
Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuireFifty Shades of Grey by E.L. JamesThoughtless by S.C. StephensBared to You by Sylvia DayFifty Shades Darker by E.L. James

Intense And “Angsty” Romance

637th out of 1,990 books — 6,002 voters
The Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsPride and Prejudice by Jane AustenTo Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeeJane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëGone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Best Female Lead Characters

926th out of 3,675 books — 4,637 voters
Born at Midnight by C.C. HunterThe Big Wide Calm by Rich MarcelloThe Summoning by Kelley ArmstrongThe Gathering by Kelley ArmstrongThe Iron King by Julie Kagawa

Best Love And YA Books

2nd out of 16 books — 9 voters
Bound by Duty by Stormy SmithThe Many Lives of Ruby Iyer by Laxmi HariharanMagic America by C.E. MedfordStarlet's Light by Carla J. HannaThe Syrian Virgin by Zack Love

Fabulous Reads for Upper Teens and New Adult

40th out of 157 books — 146 voters
Bewitched in Time by Scarlet BlackTable 21 by T. Rafael CiminoNumber 13 by M.G. WellsThe Zombie Room by R.D. RonaldThe Elephant Tree by R.D. Ronald

Best Fireside Books

7th out of 62 books — 36 voters
Bet Me by Jennifer CrusieCan You Keep a Secret? by Sophie KinsellaMatch Me If You Can by Susan Elizabeth PhillipsThe Notebook by Nicholas SparksIt Had to Be You by Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Best Ever Contemporary Romance Books

931st out of 2,994 books — 6,404 voters
Divergent by Veronica RothThe Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingGraceling by Kristin CashoreCity of Bones by Cassandra Clare

Original Stories . . . a Breath of Fresh Air

987th out of 3,780 books — 6,423 voters
City of Bones by Cassandra ClareHush, Hush by Becca FitzpatrickThe Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsTwilight by Stephenie MeyerLast Sacrifice by Richelle Mead

Character You Most Want to Sleep With

1044th out of 3,235 books — 4,527 voters
City of Ashes by Cassandra ClareHush, Hush by Becca FitzpatrickClockwork Angel by Cassandra ClareMarked by P.C. CastCity of Glass by Cassandra Clare

Books That Should Be Made Into Movies

4628th out of 21,629 books — 57,104 voters
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeeThe Outsiders by S.E. HintonThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. SalingerLittle Women by Louisa May AlcottPride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Best Coming of Age Stories

180th out of 842 books — 1,026 voters — you voted for 1 book Green check
The Fault in Our Stars by John GreenThe Help by Kathryn StockettCatching Fire by Suzanne CollinsThe Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsTo Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Smart Summer Reads

523rd out of 1,981 books — 3,097 voters
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeeThe Help by Kathryn StockettThe Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini1984 by George OrwellPride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Best Page-Turners with Redeeming Social Value

506th out of 1,442 books — 3,612 voters
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern1Q84 by Haruki MurakamiThe Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWittThe Peach Keeper by Sarah Addison AllenThe American Heiress by Daisy Goodwin

Best Cover Art 2011 (Non-YA)

177th out of 276 books — 1,614 voters
The Complete Works by William ShakespeareA Midsummer Night's Dream by William ShakespeareRomeo and Juliet by William ShakespeareAnyone But You by Kim AskewHamlet by William Shakespeare

Favourite Books of All Time and Ages

25th out of 70 books — 1 voter
God Every Day by Mike LutzThe Fault in Our Stars by John GreenA Collection of Writings Inspired by God Volume Two Kindle by Diane K. ChamberlainThe Prayer of Jabez by Bruce H. WilkinsonThe Color of Heaven by Julianne MacLean

Books of Inspiration…Inspired by God

37th out of 39 books — 3 voters

Two Poems

No One Left

Let the need to purge

those without a clue go

Replace it with

curiosity

kindness

love

Otherwise there will be

no one left.

 

Thick

If you choose me

If I am your chosen

If our blood thickens to brother, sister

Then know this: The world will heal

 

 

 

 

David Mitchell Advice to a Young Writer

DAVID MITCHELL: ADVICE TO A YOUNG WRITER

BRILLIANTLY BAD ORIGINALITY IS BETTER THAN COMPETENT MIMICRY

David Mitchell’s new novel Slade House, was just published by Random House. Mitchell’s previous books include Cloud Atlas, Bone Clocks, and The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. He recently spoke with the novelist Irina Reyn, as well as students in the University of Pittsburgh’s Writing Program.

David Mitchell: Advice to a Young Writer

25 Books Guaranteed to Make You a Better Writer

25 Books Guaranteed to Make You a Better Writer

Everyone has a story to tell. And pretty much everyone (at least everyone of a certain variety) has dreamed about writing that story down and sharing it with the world. But, er, how?

Whether you’re a fledgling scribbler or a seasoned one, there are a ton of books out there that will inspire you, guide you, and offer you sage advice that might just pop into your mind one cold November afternoon when you’re writing your novel and wondering why you can’t get this character to actually walk down the stairs. To help you sift through the masses, here are some of the best writers’ guide books, from collections of craft essays to nuts-and-bolts how-tos to collage/memoir/odes to creativity — all guaranteed to make you a better writer of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, or whatever hybrid form you may choose. Check them out, and get inspired.

25 Books Guaranteed to Make You a Better Writer

Holiday Offer

Hi,

Between now and December 1st, 2015, I’ll send you a free copy of The Color of Home or The Big wide Calm (or both).  Just send me your address in an email and I’ll put the book in the mail right away.  All I ask is that you review the book on Goodreads and Amazon (or a book purchasing site of your choice) when you are done.

Happy Holiday!

Rich

A Recent Interview with Seven Bridges’ Writers Collaborative

Bridging Writers – An Interview with Rich Marcello

Rich Marcello is a poet, musician, and creative writing teacher, and is the author of three critically acclaimed novels. The first, The Color of Home, was published in 2013 by Langdon Street Press, and melds together honest generative dialogue, poetic sensory detail, and “unforgettable characters who seem to know the complete song catalog of Lennon or Cohen.”  The second, The Big Wide Calm, was published in 2014, also by Langdon Street Press. The US Review of Books stated, “Marcello’s novel has a lot going for it. Well-written, thought-provoking, and filled with flawed characters, it meets all of the basic requirements of best-of-show in the literary fiction category.” The third, The Beauty of the Fall, will be published in 2016. Faulkner Award Winner Mark Spencer commented, “Few novels are as intelligent and relevant as The Beauty of the Fall. Almost none is as eloquent, compelling, heartbreaking, and ultimately, uplifting.”

You came to writing after a career in high-tech.  Can you tell us a little about becoming a working writer?  What inspired the transition?  And how did you approach learning the craft?

In a way, I’ve always been a writer. I’ve written songs for over thirty years and poetry, as well.  When I was in college, I was writing short stories and even had the resident novelist at Notre Dame offer to mentor me. But I was broke and in debt at the time, so I made a decision to go into hi-tech.

About five years ago, after a lot of soul-searching, I realized I’d accomplished what I wanted to in hi-tech and decided to come back to writing.  For the first couple of years, I took as many classes as I could to help perfect my craft.  I also was fortunate to be mentored by Mark Spencer, who won the Faulkner Award a number of years ago. I’ve probably learned the most about writing a novel through my interactions with him.

You are a musician as well as a novelist.  Do the two creative impulses come from the same place? In what ways do composing and playing music compliment your work as a storyteller? How conscious are you of sound on the page?

I do think the creative impulses come from the same place though they manifest themselves in different ways.  For me, music is more of a short-form medium.  Creativity in a song is about the riff, the verse, the chorus, the bridge, the clever lyric. The novel is more of a long-form medium. There, creativity is about the story, the character,  the plot turn, and the voice of the POV character or the narrator.

In general, I believe the best fiction is sensual, so I’m aware of sound on the page in addition to all of the other senses.  I try to work as many senses as I can into any given scene.

Your second novel, The Big Wide Calm, is a coming of age story about a young musician searching for both the music within and her place in the world.  What were some of your formative experiences as an artist, and how did you draw on them in creating your protagonist and her story?

When I was younger, I put out a number of albums and wrote about fifty songs.  Mostly, what carried through to TBWC was the process of creating a song. When the protagonist, Paige Plant, writes a song in the book, she uses a process similar to the one I used when I wrote my songs.

Most writers begin as avid readers.  Which authors particularly inspire you? Are there writers you consider teachers? Who are you currently reading?

I love to read and am constantly doing so.  When I was younger, I was particularly drawn to Gabriel Garcia Marquez,  Don Delillo, Milan Kundera, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, and Walker Percy. I consider all of them teachers.  More recently, I’ve loved novels by Lauren Groff, Jonathan Franzen, Alexandra Kleeman, Jessamyn Hope, Elena Ferrante, Jenni Fagan, Jennifer Offill, and Peter Heller.

Could you describe your typical writing day? 

I write for five or six hours in the morning.  I get up around five and go right to work. I’m one of those writers who believes in the idea of a fictive dream, so in a way I like to go immediately from one kind of dreaming (during sleep) to another (writing fiction in the morning). I also believe that it’s important to write every day, so for the most part, I write seven days a week.

You have two published novels, The Color of Home, and The Big Wide Calm, and a third novel is on the way.  How do you compare the experience of writing your third novel with writing your first? Are there things that come more easily? Does your approach change with the material?

In general, things comes easier now.  I find that my first draft of any given scene is much closer to the final product than when I started writing years ago. With that said, my third novel, The Beauty of the Fall, is longer than the first two, and it incorporates some dense technology into the narrative, so it has its own challenges. It seems that the more I learn my craft, the more I take on bigger and more difficult topics in my books. That way, each new book is a challenge in its own right.

How do you handle research?

I either travel to the location, or I research on the Internet. For example, my fourth novel, The Latecomers, is set in Sweden and Santa Fe. I’m planning trips to both locations to help me properly place the novel.

You write poetry as well as novels. Do the skills of a poet help in writing prose?  How does writing narrative inspire you as a poet?

Writing poetry helps in two ways. First, it helps me write concise sentences that do a lot of work. Second, sometimes I’ll spend an hour on a sentence to make sure it’s poetic enough. I find that placing a poetic sentence here and there in the narrative significantly enhances the reading experience.

Writing narrative inspires me as poet mostly from the perspectives of ideas and stories. I ask myself what idea I want to get across or what story I want to tell in the poem. When I’m done with a piece, I check what I produced against what I intended to produce. I’ve found that using this process hones the emotional content of the poems down to its essence.

You teach fiction workshops and classes. How do you approach teaching creative writing? How does teaching novel or short story writing support your own work? 

I like to combine short lectures with workshops on student’s individual pieces.  I find that combination works best. The lectures are important because they give the students the necessary tools to create good fiction. The workshops are important because so much of writing is about rewriting a piece to show a more sensual and detailed picture of what happened.

What was the best advice you ever received about writing?

To write the first pass of any scene quickly with the goal of capturing all of the critical emotions, then to rewrite the scene over and over again until you get it right.

Writing is solitary. How do you feed your creative work?  What role, if any, does community play in sustaining and nurturing you as an artist?

Yes, it is solitary. I feed my work by connecting with other writers, by teaching, and by spending time with loved ones, including my two Newfoundlands, Ani and Shaman. One of the things I would recommend to every writer is to get a dog or two. They really help with being alone all the time.

Overall, community is very important to me. In fact, the main theme of The Beauty of the Fall is how to create and sustain community in our world.  There are many ways to connect in a given community, but I’m mostly trying to connect through the arts these days.

Can you talk a little about any upcoming projects?

I hope to have The Beauty of the Fall out in 2016.  I’ve also started work on my fourth novel, The Latecomers.  If all goes well, that will be out in 2018.

What encouragement or direction would you give aspiring writers?

First, to learn their craft fully. Many writers I work with have good ideas, but they haven’t put in the time to learn how to write a novel well. Second, to be patient. It takes years to learn how to write a good story. Third, to define success not by financial gain, but by creating a piece of art that makes a difference to at least one other person in the world.

http://sevenbridgewriters.blogspot.com/2015/10/bridging-writers-interview-with-rich.html